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Shannah Laumeister on Bert Stern: Original Madman by Bill Biss

Shannah Laumeister on Bert Stern: Original Madman by Bill Biss

Shannah Laumeister on Bert Stern: Original Madman by Bill Biss originally published in ShowBiss. 

Now and for some time, Shannah Laumeister has been Mrs. Bert Stern. In 2013, I interviewed her for a very special reason. Laumeister had just released a documentary film and a brilliant one at that… on Bert Stern. Stern was a remarkable photographer of the first caliber and her partner in life at this time. You wouldn’t imagine how many famous people he’s had the pleasure of photographing… but to drop just one name; is Marilyn Monroe. Her documentary is titled Bert Stern: Original Madman. There are many incredible photos to discover through his skills and many indelible moments to discover from a realistic and loving portrait of Stern from Laumeister. (Bert Stern died a few months after this interview). Her love for him lives on.

"Shapes & Symbols US Debut

"Shapes & Symbols US Debut

Keyes Art Gallery in association with the Bert Stern Trust and Galerie 36 is pleased to present the first comprehensive exhibition of the visionary advertising photographs of American photographer Bert Stern (1929 - 2013) from the early fifties to the early seventies. The exhibition "Shapes & Symbols” shows a selection of iconic images that emerged during the highly productive time of his rise to become one of the top advertising photographers. Many of the works exhibited have never before been publicly displayed outside publications and magazines of their time and can now be seen for the first time in terms of their artistic value. 
He's So Violet Bert Stern by Christine Whitney

He's So Violet Bert Stern by Christine Whitney

He's So Violet Bert Stern by Christine Whitney originally published in Violet Grey. 

An intimate look into the private life and mind of the formidable photographer.
Bert Stern’s success began with a martini. As the story goes, in 1955, the 24-year-old photographer was commissioned to shoot a vodka campaign for Smirnoff. The resulting image, a seductive shot of a martini glass juxtaposed with an Egyptian pyramid, launched a creative revolution in advertising as well as Stern’s career, which spanned more than 50 years.
Vanity Fair Italia June 2018

Marcello Mastroianni by Bert Stern in Vanity Fair Italia

Bert Stern's portrait of Marcello Mastroianni in Vanity Fair Italia's June 2018 issue.
"Shapes & Symbols" Press Release from Galerie 36

"Shapes & Symbols" Press Release from Galerie 36

Galerie 36 is pleased to present the first comprehensive exhibition of the visionary advertising photographs of American photographer Bert Stern (1929 - 2013) from the early fifties to the early seventies. The exhibition "Shapes & Symbols” shows a selection of iconic images that emerged during the highly productive time of his rise to become one of the top advertising photographers. Many of the works exhibited have never before been publicly displayed outside publications and magazines of their time and can now be seen for the first time in terms of their artistic value.
Christy's Art Center Displays Bert Stern's Stills and Sketches in "Lolita in Sag Harbor" by Stephanie Murg

Christy's Art Center Displays Bert Stern's Stills and Sketches in "Lolita in Sag Harbor" by Stephanie Murg

Christy's Art Center Displays Bert Stern's Stills and Sketches in "Lolita in Sag Harbor" by Stephanie Murg originally published in Hamptons Magazine. 

“Lolita in Sag Harbor” explores an iconic movie image in the place where it came to life.

Little-known fact: The famous poster image of Sue Lyon, star of Stanley Kubrick’s 1962 film Lolita—with heartshaped sunglasses, pursed lips, and lollipop, all gleaming cherry-red— was created in Sag Harbor. The sultry publicity stills shot by legendary photographer Bert Stern are now on display, with his sketches and notes, at Christy’s Art Center.

The Search for Love and Lolita in Sag Harbor by Annette Hinkle

The Search for Love and Lolita in Sag Harbor by Annette Hinkle

The Search for Love and Lolita in Sag Harbor by Annette Hinkle originally published in Sag Harbor Express.

In the summer of 1961, photographer Bert Stern traveled from New York City to Sag Harbor with a 15-year old actress and her mother.

The trio stayed at the home of stylist Nancy Pearl and her husband, Arnold, and for the next seven days, Stern shot countless roles of film of the young actress in various Sag Harbor locations — on the porch of The American Hotel, in front of Barons Cove Inn, and through the mullioned-windowed door of the long-gone Bayview Hotel (now the site of People’s United bank).

Finally, he took the young actress to Pierson High School where he photographed her in a car after outfitting her with a series of all-American props he had picked up at the Sag Harbor Variety store, including lollipops, American flags, and a 39-cent pair of red heart shaped glasses.